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Tech. Sgt. Brandon Williams, the 28th Operations Support Squadron noncommissioned of in charge of airfield weather operations and Master Sgt. William Price 28th OSS Weather Flight chief, use a device that measures wind speed and binoculars to look for approaching weather conditions at Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., May 29, 2018. The weather flight helps leaders on base determine the best times to fly are to avoid any complications that could be harmful to aircrew members. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Karol) 28th Weather Flight: on the job, rain or shine
Rapid City, South Dakota, has earned the title of having the most unpredictable weather across the U.S. and Ellsworth Air Force Base just ten miles away the brunt of Mother Nature’s fury.
0 6/04
2018
Master Sgt. Leon Partin, the unit deployment manager assigned to the 28th Operations Support Squadron, checks emails on his computer Aug. 14, 2017, on Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D. Squadron UDMs often stay after work to ensure that Airmen who are deploying have all the necessary equipment, training and paperwork. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Karol) The people behind the deploying Airmen
As Airmen prepare for deployments, they’re usually presented with a checklist of different items to be completed. Yet the Airmen are not alone in the process.
0 9/12
2017
Senior Airman Jonell Sanchez, an air traffic controller assigned to the 28th Operations Support Squadron, trains in a simulation at Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., Jan. 25, 2017. The training involves sending beacon codes for Ellsworth approach while the radar system is “down.” (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald C. Knechtel) Airman overcomes barrier, guards the sky
Aircraft take to the air, navigating the highways of the sky among the birds and the breeze to reach their destination. These aviators rely on air traffic controllers to guide them safely and accurately through the open blue above.The main service air traffic controllers provide is to maintain a safe environment for the pilots. This is accomplished
0 1/25
2017
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